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Cary
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NANDA friend or foe

I, along with a classmate have to have a debate on the merits/problems with
using NANDA diagnosis. Students of today may not have any clinical
experience, but we sure will now how to argue.......
I am looking for some feedback from other students as well as working nurses
on the pros and cons of using NANDA diagnoses.

Thanks for any information.

Cary


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Old Post 02-06-2004 05:01 PM
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Cary wrote:
> I, along with a classmate have to have a debate on the merits/problems with
> using NANDA diagnosis. Students of today may not have any clinical
> experience, but we sure will now how to argue.......
> I am looking for some feedback from other students as well as working nurses
> on the pros and cons of using NANDA diagnoses.



They are crap. A total waste of time developed by people with too much time on
their hands and nothing to contribute. A medical diagnosis gives a clear
picture of the medical condition of a patient. The gaps could easily be filled
by plain English to give a complete picture of the patient.

Enter the NANDA diagnosis: it takes a plain English, easily understood
condition and clouds it with smoke and fog. I don't think doctors are
particuarly aware of NANDA, which suits me. I would prefer them not think I'm
an idiot because I crank this shit out with every admission. I don't believe in
it. I don't know a working floor nurse who buys into NANDA.

Am I the only one who thinks there's something wrong with this picture?



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
http://www.mortimerschnerd.com


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Old Post 02-07-2004 04:01 AM
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Starlight
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 17:21:21 GMT, "Cary" <cggross@nospam.pacbell.net>
wrote:

>I, along with a classmate have to have a debate on the merits/problems with
>using NANDA diagnosis. Students of today may not have any clinical
>experience, but we sure will now how to argue.......
>I am looking for some feedback from other students as well as working nurses
>on the pros and cons of using NANDA diagnoses.
>


NANDA diagnoses make -some- of those ivory tower, academic types feel
important and needed. I believe it was implemented to show that
nurses can sound like they're making a diagnosis without being
doctors; as we all know, nurses aren't allowed to diagnose medical
conditions (even though we all do it simply by relaying certain
facts/occurences over the phone to the physicians/interns/residents
when we need an order).

I believe NANDA was meant to identify problems which can be treated by
nurses without specific orders from a doctor. It was meant to
highlight nursing's contribution to patient care.

The major problem with NANDA is that very few people can understand
the meaning of the language used in NANDA without rereading the
diagnosis several times. No doctor or anyone else involved in the
care of the patient is going to take the time to decipher the wording.
It's an embarrassing attempt to make nurses look needed, when in fact
it makes us look very silly. I'm pretty sure most doctors, if told
by a nurse that the patient suffered from energy field disturbance,
might try not to laugh out loud, but they would most likely need
further explanation.
That is my interpretation of NANDA, accurate or not.
Becky

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Old Post 02-07-2004 05:00 AM
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WadeM
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

You three have altered perceptions R/T 'chronic knowledge deficit' and
perhaps an 'energy field disturbance'.

I'm a student and I agree. I believe this was done to fill in a gap in the
thinking process (nursing process). The other parts of the nursing process
are still vital to organize your approach to a specific patient, but this
just seems thrown in to make us look professional. Or maybe if they took
some (a lot) of the horseshit out, like 'energy field disturbance', it would
seem more practical.

"Starlight" <homehealth_rnDELETE@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:45ib20pqg4ab743q1e7uue8jcu1n79lr34@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 17:21:21 GMT, "Cary" <cggross@nospam.pacbell.net>
> wrote:
>
> >I, along with a classmate have to have a debate on the merits/problems

with
> >using NANDA diagnosis. Students of today may not have any clinical
> >experience, but we sure will now how to argue.......
> >I am looking for some feedback from other students as well as working

nurses
> >on the pros and cons of using NANDA diagnoses.
> >

>
> NANDA diagnoses make -some- of those ivory tower, academic types feel
> important and needed. I believe it was implemented to show that
> nurses can sound like they're making a diagnosis without being
> doctors; as we all know, nurses aren't allowed to diagnose medical
> conditions (even though we all do it simply by relaying certain
> facts/occurences over the phone to the physicians/interns/residents
> when we need an order).
>
> I believe NANDA was meant to identify problems which can be treated by
> nurses without specific orders from a doctor. It was meant to
> highlight nursing's contribution to patient care.
>
> The major problem with NANDA is that very few people can understand
> the meaning of the language used in NANDA without rereading the
> diagnosis several times. No doctor or anyone else involved in the
> care of the patient is going to take the time to decipher the wording.
> It's an embarrassing attempt to make nurses look needed, when in fact
> it makes us look very silly. I'm pretty sure most doctors, if told
> by a nurse that the patient suffered from energy field disturbance,
> might try not to laugh out loud, but they would most likely need
> further explanation.
> That is my interpretation of NANDA, accurate or not.
> Becky



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Old Post 02-07-2004 01:00 PM
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Dennis Gibbons
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Idiocy like "Impaired Energy Field" aside, I think the purpose of the NANDA
system is to move Nursing AWAY from the touchy-feely Florence Nightingale
image. In the long term, Nurses will benefit by the formalization of what
they do. What Nurses do has always been so behind the scenes that they have
never gotten the recognition (or power, or money) that they deserve.
I know it is a pain in the ass (I am working for 4 hours on one for an exam
as I write this) for those of you in the middle or near the end of your
careers. You may be gone before any real change is status occurs.
"Not charted , not done" we are taught.
"Not codified, not recognized" we will learn.

In the mean time, keep up using that therapeutic touch to enhance that
energy field.

--
Dennis Gibbons
dkgibbons at optonline dot net
"WadeM" <youdontneedtoknow@sport.rr.com> wrote in message
news:VU5Vb.9400$we.7727@fe1.texas.rr.com...
> You three have altered perceptions R/T 'chronic knowledge deficit' and
> perhaps an 'energy field disturbance'.
>
> I'm a student and I agree. I believe this was done to fill in a gap in the
> thinking process (nursing process). The other parts of the nursing process
> are still vital to organize your approach to a specific patient, but this
> just seems thrown in to make us look professional. Or maybe if they took
> some (a lot) of the horseshit out, like 'energy field disturbance', it

would
> seem more practical.
>
> "Starlight" <homehealth_rnDELETE@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:45ib20pqg4ab743q1e7uue8jcu1n79lr34@4ax.com...
> > On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 17:21:21 GMT, "Cary" <cggross@nospam.pacbell.net>
> > wrote:
> >
> > >I, along with a classmate have to have a debate on the merits/problems

> with
> > >using NANDA diagnosis. Students of today may not have any clinical
> > >experience, but we sure will now how to argue.......
> > >I am looking for some feedback from other students as well as working

> nurses
> > >on the pros and cons of using NANDA diagnoses.
> > >

> >
> > NANDA diagnoses make -some- of those ivory tower, academic types feel
> > important and needed. I believe it was implemented to show that
> > nurses can sound like they're making a diagnosis without being
> > doctors; as we all know, nurses aren't allowed to diagnose medical
> > conditions (even though we all do it simply by relaying certain
> > facts/occurences over the phone to the physicians/interns/residents
> > when we need an order).
> >
> > I believe NANDA was meant to identify problems which can be treated by
> > nurses without specific orders from a doctor. It was meant to
> > highlight nursing's contribution to patient care.
> >
> > The major problem with NANDA is that very few people can understand
> > the meaning of the language used in NANDA without rereading the
> > diagnosis several times. No doctor or anyone else involved in the
> > care of the patient is going to take the time to decipher the wording.
> > It's an embarrassing attempt to make nurses look needed, when in fact
> > it makes us look very silly. I'm pretty sure most doctors, if told
> > by a nurse that the patient suffered from energy field disturbance,
> > might try not to laugh out loud, but they would most likely need
> > further explanation.
> > That is my interpretation of NANDA, accurate or not.
> > Becky

>
>



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Old Post 02-07-2004 09:00 PM
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Dennis Gibbons wrote:
> "Not charted , not done" we are taught.



BWAHAHAHA!!! The corollary of that is "It's charted; prove I didn't do it".

While perusing the want ads last night, I was struck by how my own hospital
describes my duties as a staff nurse: "MANAGES the patient's care". Obviously,
I'm no longer expected to provide it myself.

What I provide these days are the finest of care plans. Nobody goes by them,
because they're pure horseshit, but by God they're there, and I pissed away a
significant amount of time generating them.

What in the hell happened to nursing?



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
http://www.mortimerschnerd.com


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Old Post 02-07-2004 10:01 PM
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Brian@scab.org
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Having been in the field working for 12 years now I have to say that I have
yet to see or hear ANY nurse use any nsg diagnoses other than to quickly
fill in the mandatory paperwork at admission. Most facilities now have their
nsg dx pre-printed on paper or point and click in the computer. Updating the
care plan daily is an annoying afterthought at the end of your shift if it
gets done at all. I'm talking M/S, Ortho, Tele, etc type hospital floors now
and I have worked in 7 or 8 states. On most floors I have worked (not all) a
good shift is keeping your head above water and care plans don't even make
the priority list.











DK>Idiocy like "Impaired Energy Field" aside, I think the purpose of the NANDA
DK>system is to move Nursing AWAY from the touchy-feely Florence Nightingale
DK>image. In the long term, Nurses will benefit by the formalization of what
DK>they do. What Nurses do has always been so behind the scenes that they have
DK>never gotten the recognition (or power, or money) that they deserve.
DK>I know it is a pain in the ass (I am working for 4 hours on one for an exam
DK>as I write this) for those of you in the middle or near the end of your
DK>careers. You may be gone before any real change is status occurs.
DK>"Not charted , not done" we are taught.
DK>"Not codified, not recognized" we will learn.

DK>In the mean time, keep up using that therapeutic touch to enhance that
DK>energy field.

DK>--
DK>Dennis Gibbons
DK>dkgibbons at optonline dot net
DK>"WadeM" <youdontneedtoknow@sport.rr.com> wrote in message
DK>news:VU5Vb.9400$we.7727@fe1.texas.rr.com...
DK>> You three have altered perceptions R/T 'chronic knowledge deficit' and
DK>> perhaps an 'energy field disturbance'.
DK>>
DK>> I'm a student and I agree. I believe this was done to fill in a gap in the
DK>> thinking process (nursing process). The other parts of the nursing process
DK>> are still vital to organize your approach to a specific patient, but this
DK>> just seems thrown in to make us look professional. Or maybe if they took
DK>> some (a lot) of the horseshit out, like 'energy field disturbance', it
DK>would
DK>> seem more practical.
DK>>
DK>> "Starlight" <homehealth_rnDELETE@yahoo.com> wrote in message
DK>> news:45ib20pqg4ab743q1e7uue8jcu1n79lr34@4ax.com...
DK>> > On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 17:21:21 GMT, "Cary" <cggross@nospam.pacbell.net>
DK>> > wrote:
DK>> >
DK>> > >I, along with a classmate have to have a debate on the merits/problems
DK>> with
DK>> > >using NANDA diagnosis. Students of today may not have any clinical
DK>> > >experience, but we sure will now how to argue.......
DK>> > >I am looking for some feedback from other students as well as working
DK>> nurses
DK>> > >on the pros and cons of using NANDA diagnoses.
DK>> > >
DK>> >
DK>> > NANDA diagnoses make -some- of those ivory tower, academic types feel
DK>> > important and needed. I believe it was implemented to show that
DK>> > nurses can sound like they're making a diagnosis without being
DK>> > doctors; as we all know, nurses aren't allowed to diagnose medical
DK>> > conditions (even though we all do it simply by relaying certain
DK>> > facts/occurences over the phone to the physicians/interns/residents
DK>> > when we need an order).
DK>> >
DK>> > I believe NANDA was meant to identify problems which can be treated by
DK>> > nurses without specific orders from a doctor. It was meant to
DK>> > highlight nursing's contribution to patient care.
DK>> >
DK>> > The major problem with NANDA is that very few people can understand
DK>> > the meaning of the language used in NANDA without rereading the
DK>> > diagnosis several times. No doctor or anyone else involved in the
DK>> > care of the patient is going to take the time to decipher the wording.
DK>> > It's an embarrassing attempt to make nurses look needed, when in fact
DK>> > it makes us look very silly. I'm pretty sure most doctors, if told
DK>> > by a nurse that the patient suffered from energy field disturbance,
DK>> > might try not to laugh out loud, but they would most likely need
DK>> > further explanation.
DK>> > That is my interpretation of NANDA, accurate or not.
DK>> > Becky
DK>>
DK>>

/ **************************************************
********/
/* Brian */
/* brian@scab.org */
/* */
/* Sent from Scab.Org */
/ **************************************************
********/


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Old Post 02-08-2004 02:00 AM
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Starlight
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 21:47:34 GMT, "Dennis Gibbons"
<dkgibbons@optonline.net> wrote:

>Idiocy like "Impaired Energy Field" aside, I think the purpose of the NANDA
>system is to move Nursing AWAY from the touchy-feely Florence Nightingale
>image.


Isn't that kind of sad? That's why I went into nursing, and stay in
a job where I can provide hands on care...because of the touchy feely
aspect, rather than the clipboard aspect.


> In the long term, Nurses will benefit by the formalization of what
>they do.


But will the patients?

Becky

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Old Post 02-08-2004 04:01 AM
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TanteEm
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

> I don't think doctors are
>particuarly aware of NANDA, which suits me. I would prefer them not think
>I'm
>an idiot because I crank this shit out with every admission. I don't believe
>in
>it. I don't know a working floor nurse who buys into NANDA.


While I think they're good for students/educational purposes (in plain English,
please) they're hardly valued by any working nurse I know. We might spit 'em
out but I don't know anyone who ever refers to them again.
I once showed a careplan to a doctor who laughed his ass off at the wording of
these things. Talk about making "nursing" looking like idiots. Geesh.

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Old Post 02-08-2004 06:00 AM
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Kurt Ullman
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

In article <0f4e20t4pu0skh6e4rmg5d9vak4lthstb9@4ax.com>, Starlight
<homehealth_rnDELETE@yahoo.com> wrote:

>> In the long term, Nurses will benefit by the formalization of what
>>they do.

>
>But will the patients?
>

The other question is when does the long term kick in. I did the
NANDA shuffle in school back in the mid-80s. Nearly 20 years should be enuff
of long term to see some benefit.

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Old Post 02-08-2004 11:00 AM
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

TanteEm wrote:
>> I don't think doctors are
>> particuarly aware of NANDA, which suits me. I would prefer them not think
>> I'm
>> an idiot because I crank this shit out with every admission. I don't believe
>> in
>> it. I don't know a working floor nurse who buys into NANDA.

>
> While I think they're good for students/educational purposes (in plain
> English, please) they're hardly valued by any working nurse I know. We might
> spit 'em out but I don't know anyone who ever refers to them again.
> I once showed a careplan to a doctor who laughed his ass off at the wording of
> these things. Talk about making "nursing" looking like idiots. Geesh.



You and Brian are my kind of nurses. That is my point exactly. They were
originally developed supposedly to add "professionalism" by developing our own
unique area of expertise. The problem is that anybody with 2 functioning gray
cells sees them for the shit that they are. Care plans and nursing diagnoses
embarrass me.

We used to just crank out the care plan with every admission and forget about
it. That was acceptable. Then our friendly state DHEC came and blew a gasket
because we weren't updating them. Now we have to document a review of the plan
of care during every shift. This leads to such pearls of wisdom such as:

"Plan of care reviewed: patient has maintained electrolyte balance compatible
with life. Pain has been managed to acceptable limits by medication."

Now my notes include a beginning of shift assessment and a plan of care review
such as the one I just wrote. I seldom write another word unless the patient
codes. My notes are essentially useless to anyone, so why am I writing them? I
arrive at 0645 for a 0700 start and work until 1930 without a break. Breaks for
me are when I sit to chart. I don't eat lunch anymore since my gastric bypass
(don't get hungry so why eat?). The point is I work hard from when I arrive
until when I leave. There's no place for me to tighten up to give me more time
to accomplish things. Since I'm bound and determined to leave as close to 1930
as possible, I chose to cut down on my charting. If they want more charting,
they'll have to give me less patients.

I don't have time to piss away. That's why I get angry that I'm spending any
time at all on care plans or nursing diagnoses. It's no more significant in the
scheme of things than a fart in a gale.

Why is it that people who don't know what they're doing always get to tell those
who do what to do and how to do it? There's something basically wrong with this
picture. It has a lot to do with why I can't wait to retire.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
http://www.mortimerschnerd.com


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Old Post 02-08-2004 03:04 PM
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Brian@scab.org
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Perhaps licensed massage therapy. I believe they make more money and do NO
paperwork.







HO>On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 21:47:34 GMT, "Dennis Gibbons"
HO><dkgibbons@optonline.net> wrote:

HO>>Idiocy like "Impaired Energy Field" aside, I think the purpose of the NANDA
HO>>system is to move Nursing AWAY from the touchy-feely Florence Nightingale
HO>>image.

HO>Isn't that kind of sad? That's why I went into nursing, and stay in
HO>a job where I can provide hands on care...because of the touchy feely
HO>aspect, rather than the clipboard aspect.


HO>> In the long term, Nurses will benefit by the formalization of what
HO>>they do.

HO>But will the patients?

HO>Becky

/ **************************************************
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/* brian@scab.org */
/* */
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/ **************************************************
********/


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Old Post 02-08-2004 03:04 PM
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WadeM
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

So exactly what would one of Mort's dxs look like say for a 'bed-rider' with
scratch-and-sniff pressure ulcers and bowel incontinence? Just curious, I
want to learn!


"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerd@XXXX.carolina.rr.com> wrote in message
news:aErVb.2862$ob.523184@twister.southeast.rr.com...
> TanteEm wrote:
> >> I don't think doctors are
> >> particuarly aware of NANDA, which suits me. I would prefer them not

think
> >> I'm
> >> an idiot because I crank this shit out with every admission. I don't

believe
> >> in
> >> it. I don't know a working floor nurse who buys into NANDA.

> >
> > While I think they're good for students/educational purposes (in plain
> > English, please) they're hardly valued by any working nurse I know. We

might
> > spit 'em out but I don't know anyone who ever refers to them again.
> > I once showed a careplan to a doctor who laughed his ass off at the

wording of
> > these things. Talk about making "nursing" looking like idiots. Geesh.

>
>
> You and Brian are my kind of nurses. That is my point exactly. They were
> originally developed supposedly to add "professionalism" by developing our

own
> unique area of expertise. The problem is that anybody with 2 functioning

gray
> cells sees them for the shit that they are. Care plans and nursing

diagnoses
> embarrass me.
>
> We used to just crank out the care plan with every admission and forget

about
> it. That was acceptable. Then our friendly state DHEC came and blew a

gasket
> because we weren't updating them. Now we have to document a review of the

plan
> of care during every shift. This leads to such pearls of wisdom such as:
>
> "Plan of care reviewed: patient has maintained electrolyte balance

compatible
> with life. Pain has been managed to acceptable limits by medication."
>
> Now my notes include a beginning of shift assessment and a plan of care

review
> such as the one I just wrote. I seldom write another word unless the

patient
> codes. My notes are essentially useless to anyone, so why am I writing

them? I
> arrive at 0645 for a 0700 start and work until 1930 without a break.

Breaks for
> me are when I sit to chart. I don't eat lunch anymore since my gastric

bypass
> (don't get hungry so why eat?). The point is I work hard from when I

arrive
> until when I leave. There's no place for me to tighten up to give me more

time
> to accomplish things. Since I'm bound and determined to leave as close to

1930
> as possible, I chose to cut down on my charting. If they want more

charting,
> they'll have to give me less patients.
>
> I don't have time to piss away. That's why I get angry that I'm spending

any
> time at all on care plans or nursing diagnoses. It's no more significant

in the
> scheme of things than a fart in a gale.
>
> Why is it that people who don't know what they're doing always get to tell

those
> who do what to do and how to do it? There's something basically wrong

with this
> picture. It has a lot to do with why I can't wait to retire.
>
>
>
> --
> Mortimer Schnerd, RN
>
> mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
> http://www.mortimerschnerd.com
>
>



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Old Post 02-08-2004 10:01 PM
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

WadeM wrote:
> So exactly what would one of Mort's dxs look like say for a 'bed-rider' with
> scratch-and-sniff pressure ulcers and bowel incontinence? Just curious, I
> want to learn!



Knowledge Deficit and Anxiety. Even though they insist we review these every
shift, nobody really gives a shit what they say. After all, it's not like
anybody actually refers to it when care is given.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
http://www.mortimerschnerd.com


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Old Post 02-09-2004 01:00 AM
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Brian@scab.org
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

I once turned in a Home health Medicare visit note with a verse of the star
spangled banner wedged between 4 sentences of actual note. I never did hear
a word about it.







MS>You and Brian are my kind of nurses. That is my point exactly. They were
MS>originally developed supposedly to add "professionalism" by developing our o
MS>unique area of expertise. The problem is that anybody with 2 functioning gr
MS>cells sees them for the shit that they are. Care plans and nursing diagnose
MS>embarrass me.

MS>We used to just crank out the care plan with every admission and forget abou
MS>it. That was acceptable. Then our friendly state DHEC came and blew a gask
MS>because we weren't updating them. Now we have to document a review of the p
MS>of care during every shift. This leads to such pearls of wisdom such as:

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Old Post 02-09-2004 05:02 PM
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Brian@scab.org
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Oh, I've got one:
Altered ADL's r/t health care system keeping him alive beyond what is
natural secondary to facility's need to keep on billing.
Plan: Keepem alive till 7:05





YO>So exactly what would one of Mort's dxs look like say for a 'bed-rider' with
YO>scratch-and-sniff pressure ulcers and bowel incontinence? Just curious, I
YO>want to learn!

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Old Post 02-09-2004 05:02 PM
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Brian@scab.org wrote:
> Plan: Keepem alive till 7:05



Not long enough... I don't get out the door until 1930, so the plan should be
"Keep 'em alive until 7:35". However, if they cack it a little earlier and
there's no family around, deniability is enhanced by closing the door and
cranking up the heat.

I've actually had this pulled on me. What could I say? The patient was still
warm.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
http://www.mortimerschnerd.com


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Old Post 02-10-2004 01:01 AM
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Brian@scab.org
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

haha. I got into the habit of doing a quick breathing rounds BEFORE I went
into report.





MS>Brian@scab.org wrote:
MS>> Plan: Keepem alive till 7:05


MS>Not long enough... I don't get out the door until 1930, so the plan should b
MS>"Keep 'em alive until 7:35". However, if they cack it a little earlier and
MS>there's no family around, deniability is enhanced by closing the door and
MS>cranking up the heat.

MS>I've actually had this pulled on me. What could I say? The patient was sti
MS>warm.



MS>--
MS>Mortimer Schnerd, RN

MS>mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
MS>http://www.mortimerschnerd.com

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Old Post 02-10-2004 01:01 AM
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Kimba
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

On 09 Feb 2004 12:58:24 EST, Brian@scab.org wrote:

>Oh, I've got one:
>Altered ADL's r/t health care system keeping him alive beyond what is
>natural secondary to facility's need to keep on billing.
>Plan: Keepem alive till 7:05


May I borrow this?

I'm back in school, finishing off my BSN so that I can get into grad
school and do what I really want to do - and I've got to write a
##%#^% care plan.

Gawd, I thought I was done with that.

I think I'm suffering from Alternation in Mentation, Secondary to
Useless Information Brain Overload.

Fortunately, my other nursing class is really teaching me something.
It's tough and I may not walk out of there with an A, but I'll be a
better nurse for it.

Kimba

--You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you did better. Maya Angelou

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Old Post 02-10-2004 10:01 PM
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Kimba
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 05:40:59 GMT, Starlight
<homehealth_rnDELETE@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I'm pretty sure most doctors, if told
>by a nurse that the patient suffered from energy field disturbance,
>might try not to laugh out loud, but they would most likely need
>further explanation.


Hey - I forgot about that one.

That can be my second, of four required nursing diagnoses for my care
plan project.

ReikiKimba

--You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you did better. Maya Angelou

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Old Post 02-10-2004 10:01 PM
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Brian@scab.org
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

You probably won't get an A with this one but it would be memorable..hahaha






KI>On 09 Feb 2004 12:58:24 EST, Brian@scab.org wrote:

KI>>Oh, I've got one:
KI>>Altered ADL's r/t health care system keeping him alive beyond what is
KI>>natural secondary to facility's need to keep on billing.
KI>>Plan: Keepem alive till 7:05

KI>May I borrow this?

KI>I'm back in school, finishing off my BSN so that I can get into grad
KI>school and do what I really want to do - and I've got to write a
KI>##%#^% care plan.

KI>Gawd, I thought I was done with that.

KI>I think I'm suffering from Alternation in Mentation, Secondary to
KI>Useless Information Brain Overload.

KI>Fortunately, my other nursing class is really teaching me something.
KI>It's tough and I may not walk out of there with an A, but I'll be a
KI>better nurse for it.

KI>Kimba

KI> --You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you did b

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Old Post 02-11-2004 05:03 AM
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WadeM
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

Scared and stupid? That's very concise!

"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerd@XXXX.carolina.rr.com> wrote in message
news:0qBVb.4904$ob.841121@twister.southeast.rr.com...
> WadeM wrote:
> > So exactly what would one of Mort's dxs look like say for a 'bed-rider'

with
> > scratch-and-sniff pressure ulcers and bowel incontinence? Just curious,

I
> > want to learn!

>
>
> Knowledge Deficit and Anxiety. Even though they insist we review these

every
> shift, nobody really gives a shit what they say. After all, it's not like
> anybody actually refers to it when care is given.
>
>
>
> --
> Mortimer Schnerd, RN
>
> mortschnerd@XXXXcarolina.rr.com
> http://www.mortimerschnerd.com
>
>



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Old Post 02-12-2004 03:04 PM
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Cary
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

I want to thank everyone for their input. Of coure I have the other side of
the argument to defend and haven't gotten any good answers to BS, I mean
defend the positives of using NANDA and care plans. It says a lot when the
only people defending them are the course coordinators who don't even have
clinicals anymore and the clinical instructors that do bad mouth them. Then
again, it leads to pretty lenient grading.....


<Brian@scab.org> wrote in message news:10764758113241@www.scab.org...
> You probably won't get an A with this one but it would be

memorable..hahaha
>
>
>
>
>
>
> KI>On 09 Feb 2004 12:58:24 EST, Brian@scab.org wrote:
>
> KI>>Oh, I've got one:
> KI>>Altered ADL's r/t health care system keeping him alive beyond what is
> KI>>natural secondary to facility's need to keep on billing.
> KI>>Plan: Keepem alive till 7:05
>
> KI>May I borrow this?
>
> KI>I'm back in school, finishing off my BSN so that I can get into grad
> KI>school and do what I really want to do - and I've got to write a
> KI>##%#^% care plan.
>
> KI>Gawd, I thought I was done with that.
>
> KI>I think I'm suffering from Alternation in Mentation, Secondary to
> KI>Useless Information Brain Overload.
>
> KI>Fortunately, my other nursing class is really teaching me something.
> KI>It's tough and I may not walk out of there with an A, but I'll be a
> KI>better nurse for it.
>
> KI>Kimba
>
> KI> --You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you

did b
>
> / **************************************************
********/
> /* Brian */
> /* brian@scab.org */
> /* */
> /* Sent from Scab.Org */
> / **************************************************
********/
>
>
> This message generated from Scab.Org



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Old Post 02-13-2004 03:00 AM
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Kimba
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 03:06:53 GMT, "Cary" <cggross@nospam.pacbell.net>
wrote:

>I want to thank everyone for their input. Of coure I have the other side of
>the argument to defend and haven't gotten any good answers to BS, I mean
>defend the positives of using NANDA and care plans. It says a lot when the
>only people defending them are the course coordinators who don't even have
>clinicals anymore and the clinical instructors that do bad mouth them. Then
>again, it leads to pretty lenient grading.....


I do feel your pain, believe me.

Current assignment is to write a care plan, with 3 primary nursing
diagnoses and a collaborative problem.

It's worth 25% of my grade, so I'd best suck it up. And while I'd
love to use "energy field disturbance", I don't think that's gonna
fly.

Kimba

--You did then what you knew how to do, and when you knew better, you did better. Maya Angelou

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Old Post 02-13-2004 11:00 AM
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TanteEm
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Re: NANDA friend or foe

>1. NANDA exists to increase the visibility of nursing's contribution
>to health care and to classify the profession's interests.
>



Visibility to whom? No one outside of nursing needs these from us, and we
certainly don't need to do them once outside of the arena of academia. They
serve a great teaching function, but I certainly find them to be an
embarrassment to the working functioning bedside nurse.
I'm curious as to if there are actually any bedside nurses who like and want to
use these time wasters or is it just those sitting behind desks who feel a need
to justify their existence?


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Old Post 02-14-2004 11:00 PM
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